Megatober … The plan for 31 riffs

One of the reasons I started writing a lot less on this site in recent months, was so I could dedicate more time to the act of guitar playing. Less time writing. More time learning.

To be honest, it’s not gone exactly to plan. I have played more guitar than I had played in previous months, but it hasn’t been enough. I’ve spoken to some friends on Twitter about collaborating and I am yet to get around to that. Thinking about that further, there are more than a few people I would love to do online collaborations with. But my skills have slipped. I need to improve that before it’s too late. I realise this. And I have a plan.

That plan is called Megatober.

Dragon’s Scale guitar plectrums Indiegogo campaign

So here’s a little something I only just discovered. I never wrote about the cool Dragon’s Heart plectrum I got a few years back—it’s pictured in the header of this article if you’re on the home page right now. I thought I had written about how impressive the plectrum is, but … well it seems it’s another thing I never got around to. Well, I can’t let my laziness get in the way of promoting their Indiegogo campaign. Because if the Dragon’s Scale plectrum is anywhere near as cool as the Dragon’s Heart plectrum, then you’re going to want to know about it.

Nailed it with a single album release

Back in June, I asked a question on Twitter that was “What was the best rock/metal band that only released one album?” To many people, this kind of band is deemed to be a one-hit wonder. But as someone who has never released any kind of album—or EP for that matter—this question really got me thinking.

What if these bands made one album so good, they felt like they had nothing left to prove?

As I consider putting together an EP—which will no doubt take me the next ten years—I find myself wondering if I will put together the best I’ll ever have to contribute and then never try again. It’s likely. It’s also likely that I will never release an album like anything in this short list I’ve compiled called Nailed it with a single album release.

Enjoy.

52 guitarists—the summary and the apology

For over three years now I’ve been trying my best to put together an annual list which I cleverly called the 52 series. It started with 52 guitars, followed by 52 amplifiers, 52 pedals and this year’s 52 guitarists. Last year I struggled to keep up with the weekly posts and this year is off to a very bad start as well. I will not go into the details of why, but I sadly need to admit defeat at this stage and recognise that I am not going to be able to further commit to the weekly article series.

The series stops today.

As mentioned in an earlier post, the 52 guitarists list itself had been written, I just needed to write about each entry weekly—something I can no longer do. So, the best I can do is share with you now the entire list as it would have played out during the year. For those who were reading these with me, I thank you for your feedback to date and hope to see you around on Twitter. My Facebook page is going to close down as well—it is also something I can no longer commit to.

I have no idea what this website will become, but it will be updated a lot less frequently for a while until I can dedicate the time this site needs to remain relevant. Hopefully in time I’ll work out a way to get my mojo back.

52 guitarists, week 16—Joe Satriani

Back in the early 1980s, my parents were certain that my new-found interest in heavy metal music was going to cause me to either join a satanic cult or commit suicide. No matter what I did or said, they were convinced bad things were going to happen to me if I continued down this guitar-driven path of doom. That was until a few years later when they heard me listening to Joe Satriani—the track Always With Me, Always With You in particular.

This was the first distorted guitarist my parents heard that made my attraction to guitar understandable to them. From that point on, my life at home while listening to heavy guitar filled music was much easier. I gained some freedom and my Mum purchased the Surfing With The Alien CD. So I’d say Joe Satriani and I both had a small win back then.